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Jayson Werth was all ready to catch this fly ball. Only problem: It fell 20 feet behind him

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We've all been in this situation: Whether by accident or simple bad luck, you're put in a situation you have no chance to succeed in. Perhaps you fudged your resume and you're now left using software that we've never used before. Or maybe you're in an emergency and, for some reason, people are looking to you for guidance. 

When that happens, there are two things you can do: Fess up or act like you know what you're doing. In the top of the second during Friday's 7-0 loss to the Dodgers, Jayson Werth chose the second option.

When Andre Ethier hit a deep fly ball to right, Werth got under it. He put his glove up, ready to make the catch. And then ... the ball fell behind him, bouncing over the wall for an RBI ground rule double: 

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It's a simple enough occurrence, as Werth lost the ball in the lights at dusk when the ball easily blends in with the sky.

"It was probably like four or five minutes of just a real purple sky, which is usually pretty tough," Werth said. "We knew anything going up was going to be tough. And when it went up, I ran to a spot and I thought I'd at least be close, so that if I saw it coming down, maybe I can get to it."  

He then put up the glove to attempt to deke the runners, which he admitted both did and didn't work as Chase Utley held at second base, but still came around to score. "It's a helpless feeling," Werth admitted. "You want to make all the plays and I put Edwin [Jackson] n a bad spot. If we got out of that inning right there, it's a three-run game. It's a totally different game."

"That's twilight, and it's not called twilight for nothing," Dusty Baker admitted. "The lights don't help and the sun's not a factor. That's a tough time of the night. Guys always remind each other, if you lose it, let us know. We were as surprised as anybody, but you could tell he lost it. I was hoping that he would have found it."

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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